Frequently Asked Questions

Criminal Law

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A NOTICE TO APPEAR AND BEING ARRESTED?

For some misdemeanor offenses (petit theft, traffic offenses, and possession of marijuana), an officer may choose to give you a NOTICE TO APPEAR rather than arrest you and bring you to jail. If you are ARRESTED, you are handcuffed, taken to Orient Road Jail, booked into the jail, and given a bond. In order to get out of jail, you will need to post a bond in order to insure that you will appear at your future Court hearing(s). If you are given a NOTICE TO APPEAR by the officer, the paper will notify you of your future court date, you are not handcuffed and not booked into jail. You are free to go. But you must still appear at your Court hearing. If you fail to appear, a warrant will be issued for your arrest. YOU SHOULD ALWAYS ASK THE OFFICER FOR A NOTICE TO APPEAR RATHER THAN BE ARRESTED.

WHAT IS A BOND? AND HOW DO I GET OUT OF JAIL?

The bond is used to insure you will appear at each and every Court hearing until the case is fully resolved. Each crime usually has a standard bond amount that attaches once you are booked into jail. In order to be released from jail, you need to post that bond amount. The more serious the crime, the higher the bond amount. Some crimes (domestic violence battery, violent crimes, sex crimes, and certain drug trafficking crimes) have NO BOND and you must stay in jail until your case is heard by a Judge.

When you are booked in jail, you will be told your bond amount. If you want to get out of jail, you have two options:

Option 1: Have a friend or family member (“depositor”) come to Orient Road Jail with the full amount in cash. This is called a “cash bond”. You will be released from jail – although it may take many hours to be processed through the system. If you appear at all court hearings (unless your attorney appears on your behalf), the depositor will get the cash bond returned to them once the case is finished in Court. HOWEVER, if you are found guilty of the crime, the Court may order you to pay court costs out of the posted cash bond amount. If so, the remaining balance will be returned to the depositor.
Option 2: You, a friend or family member can hire a bondsman. Typically, the depositor will give the bondsman 10% of the total bond amount (called “the juice”). This “juice” will not be returned to the depositor but is considered the bondsman’s fee. In addition to the “juice”, the depositor will have to come up with collateral equal to the 90% remaining balance. The collateral may be a title to a car, house, jewelry, etc. Once your court case is finished, and you appear at all the court hearings, then the collateral is returned to the depositor. If you fail to appear at the Court hearing, then the collateral can be kept by the bondsman.

WHAT IS A DIVERSION PROGRAM? DO I QUALIFY?

For felony offenses, the diversion program is called PRE-TRIAL INTERVENTION (PTI). This program is a tremendous opportunity for first time offenders because if you successfully complete the program, the criminal charges are DISMISSED against you.

  • PTI is available at the sole discretion of the State Attorney’s Office and usually requires the victim to agree.
  • The program requires you to appear at the PTI officer’s office once per month to show proof of compliance with the PTI requirements.
  • These requirements may include: community service hourse, drug and alcohol evaluation and treatment, random urine screens, paying restitution to the victim, letter(s) of apology, etc. The requirements vary with the type of offense and tailored to meet the particular facts of your case.
  • The program is 9-18 months long.
  • After successfully completing the program, the charges against you are DISMISSED and you may be eligible to have the charges expunged from your record.
  • HOWEVER, if you violate the terms of the PTI program or are arrested with a new criminal charge, you will be expelled from the program and the court case will restart against you from the beginning.
  • To qualify for PTI, you cannot have any prior felony charges against you. You cannot have too many prior misdemeanor charges against you.

For misdemeanor charges, the diversion program is called MISDEMEANOR INTERVENTION PROGRAM (MIP). Like PTI, this program is a tremendous opportunity for first-time offenders because after you successfully complete the program, the criminal charges are DISMISSED against you.

  • MIP is available at the sole discretion of the State Attorney’s Office and usually requires the victim to agree.
  • The program requires you to appear at the MIP officer’s office once per month to show proof of compliance with the MIP requirements.
  • These requirements may include: community service hourse, drug and alcohol evaluation and treatment, random urine screens, paying restitution to the victim, letter(s) of apology, etc. The requirements vary with the type of offense and can be tailored to fit the particular facts of your case.
  • The program is typically 3-6 months long.
  • After successfully completing the program, the charges against you are DISMISSED and you may be eligible to have the charges expunged from your record.
  • HOWEVER, if you violate the terms of the MIP program or are arrested with a new criminal charge, you will be expelled from the program and the court case will restart against you from the beginning.
  • To qualify for MIP, you cannot have any prior misdemeanor or felony charges against you.

WHAT IF I WASN’T READ MY MIRANDA RIGHTS?

Miranda Rights are:  1.) You have the right to remain silent.  2.) Anything you say can and will be used against you.  3.) You have the right to an attorney before and during any interrogation.  4.) If you cannot afford an attorney, you have the right to have an attorney appointed to you before and during any questioning.

  • Miranda Rights apply only when a person is detained by the police or a person is not free to leave AND, the person is being asked questions by the police which may result in an incriminating response.
  • A person who is accused of committing a crime by law enforcement must be read his/her Miranda Rights before he/she can be subjected to a custodial interrogation.
  • You can be arrested and NEVER read your Miranda Rights.
  • If you are detained and the officer wants to question you about the crime, the police officer must first read you your Miranda Rights.
  • If you are detained and questioned without Miranda Rights, the criminal case usually will not be dismissed. But, the statements you made without the Miranda Rights may be suppressed and not allowed to be used against you.

 

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN PLEADING NOT GUILTY, GUILTY, OR NO-CONTEST?

There are three types of pleas:

  • NOT GUILTY: means you formally deny committing the crime of which you are accused. If you plea Not Guilty, your case will proceed towards a trial where the State must prove you guilty of the crime. You can change this plea at any time during the course of the Court case.
  • GUILTY: means you formally admit to committing the crime of which you are accused.
  • NO-CONTEST: means you do not admit to committing the crime nor do you deny committing the crime. Rather, you admit that the STate can prove the case against you.
For sentencing purposes, either a plea of Guilty or No-Contest will result in the same sentence.

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN ADJUDICATION OF GUILT AND A WITHHOLD OF ADJUDICATION OF GUILT?

In Florida, a person who pleads guilty or no-contest to a criminal charge or who goes to trial and is found guilty of a criminal charge will be sentenced by a Judge. The Judge can sentence someone to an ADJUDICATION OF GUILT or the Judge can WITHHOLD ADJUDICATION OF GUILT.

If the Judge adjudicates you guilty, it means you have been formally found guilty of the crime and you are convicted of the crime. For both misdemeanor and felony convictions, this will be on your permanent record. For felony charges, you will be a convicted felon and face many restrictions of your liberties (i.e. unable to vote, possess firearms, denied certain employment, etc). You must be convicted in order to be sentenced to jail or prison time. Additionally:

  • If you are convicted of a drug offense, the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles (DHSMV) may suspend your driver’s license for two years.
  • If you plea guilty, no contest, or are found guilty by a jury of a DUI, you must be ADJUDICATED GUILTY.
  • If you are adjudicated guilty of any crime, you are not eligible to have that crime or any other crime (prior or subsequent) sealed or expunged from your record.

If the Judge withholds adjudication of guilt, it means you have not been formally found guilty of the crime and there is no conviction. It is possible to plea guilty to a crime but still receive a withhold of adjudication and thus, not be convicted of the crime. However, for punishment, the Judge can still order you to probation or other sanctions.

  • If you receive a withhold of adjudication of guilt, you can lawfully deny being convicted of a crime.
  • You may also be eligible to have your criminal record sealed.

THERE ARE 5 WAYS A CRIMINAL CASE IS RESOLVED IN STATE COURT.

There are 1 of 5 ways a criminal case is resolved in State Court.

  1. Nolle Prosse (State Attorney’s Office drops the criminal charge): Andrew will always evaluate a case and first determine whether this Nolle Prosse option is available. This means a careful review of the facts, the client’s background and history, and the strengths and weaknesses of the case. If it is a viable option, Andrew will work to convince the prosecutor that the case should be dropped against his client.
  2. Diversion Program: First time offenders may be eligible to enter a pretrial diversion program as a way to resolve their case. These programs are available at the discretion of the State Attorney’s Office and not the Judge. These programs are available for some felony, misdemeanor, juvenile and even some traffic offenses (NOT DUI). The beauty of these programs is that a client does NOT have to admit guilt in order to be allowed in the program. Once the client successfully completes the diversion program, the case is dismissed. Later, the client may be eligible to have the criminal record expunged.
  3. Motion Practice: While reviewing a client’s case, Andrew may determine that an appropriate motion can resolve the case in his client’s best interests. For example, a Motion to Suppress illegally obtained evidence may result in some or all of the evidence being inadmissible, thereby weakening the State’s case or resulting in the case being dropped. Similarly, a Motion to Dismiss may result in a full dismissal of the case. Andrew has successfully argued a wide variety of these motions before the Courts. It is critical to have an attorney like Andrew who is up to date with the constantly changing laws and court rulings in criminal trial law.
  4. Plea bargain: A plea bargain is the most common way a case is resolved. The job of a good defense attorney is to show the prosecutor the weaknesses of the State’s case in order to obtain a favorable plea offer for their client. Andrew will thoroughly dissect a case and present the weaknesses to the Prosecutor. A plea offer may include a reduced charge, probation instead of incarceration, or a greatly reduced period of incarceration. Andrew will work hard to obtain the best offer for his client. With the State’s offer in hand, Andrew will discuss the case, the offer, the consequences of accepting or rejecting the offer, and other options.
  5. Trial: A trial is when you assert your innocence and you demand your right to a public trial. At trial, 6 members of the public (jury) will hear the evidence and decide if you are innocent or guilty of the charges. Before you decide to proceed with a trial, Andrew will meet with you and have an in-depth discussion about all aspects of the case. Andrew will discuss the consequences such a trial may have on the client, the client’s family, job, and personal life. Andrew will give his expert opinion on the likelihood of success at trial and the possible consequences if you are found guilty.